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[afro-nets] March 4 Resource Posting


  • Subject: [afro-nets] March 4 Resource Posting
  • From: The Southern Health & Ecology Institute <shae@worldonline.co.za>
  • Date: Thu, 4 Mar 2004 03:27:50 +0200
  • Organization: The Southern Health & Ecology Institute

March 4 Resource Posting
------------------------

RESOURCES


HOW CAN OUR RESEARCH BE IMPROVED TO BETTER ENSURE THAT RESULTS
ARE TRANSLATED INTO ACTION?

http://www.eldis.org/cf/search/disp/DocDisplay.cfm?Doc=DOC14220&Resource=f1health

This article explores how health research can be improved to en-
sure that its results are translated into action. It is based on
the author's experience of health research on HIV/AIDS in South
Africa. The article pays particular attention to dissemination,
and it argues that the most common approach to information dis-
semination adopted by research organisations, passive dissemina-
tion of information in the form of research reports and policy
recommendations, is largely ineffective.


WITS HIV/AIDS IN THE WORKPLACE RESEARCH SYMPOSIUM

29th And 30th June 2004
Wits University, Johannesburg, South Africa

http://www.alp.org.za/view.php?file=/resctr/other/20031208_Symposium.xml


HIV/AIDS in the workplace constitutes an important research node
for a wide range of disciples including business, economics,
law, public health and the social sciences. This symposium will
provide an opportunity for researchers in these fields to pre-
sent and cross-fertilise their work. Within the context of the
HIV/AIDS epidemic it is important that research is orientated
towards sustainable solutions. Papers orientated to understand-
ing underlying problems and how they should be addressed, along
with papers from 'action researchers' including managers and
trade unionists are welcomed.


HIV/AIDS PROGRAMME PLANNING COURSE

17-22 May, 2004
Cape Town, South Africa

http://www.synergyaids.com/tc_devEss04.htm

Using a variety of learning modalities, including case studies,
this course is designed to build capacity at the country level
for the management of expanded resources. It will assist program
managers to formulate effective HIV/AIDS and STI intervention
strategies, address priorities for rapid scale-up, use research-
to-practice approaches to inform programming decisions, and es-
tablish systems for Strategic Information including surveil-
lance, program improvement and health monitoring information
systems.


INASP HEALTH LINKS

http://www.inasp.info/health/links/

INASP Health Links is an Internet Gateway to more than 600 web-
sites selected for health professionals, medical libraries, and
publishers in developing and transitional countries. Several up-
dates have recently been added.


THE SOCIAL MEDICINE PORTAL

http://www.socialmedicine.org

This website is devoted to promoting the principles and practice
of social medicine. The goal in developing this site is to put
readers in touch with some of the diverse international re-
sources available for health activists and those interested in
the interactions between health and society.


TREATING HIV & AIDS: A TRAINING TOOLKIT

http://www.aidsmap.com/toolkit

NAM, the publisher of http://www.aidsmap.com and the electronic
newsletter "HIV & AIDS Treatment in Practice", has launched a
major new resource, 'Treating HIV & AIDS: A Training Toolkit'.
This project is a response to the scaling-up of antiretroviral
therapy in resource-limited settings, and was developed with the
support of doctors providing training on ARVs in Botswana, Kenya
and South Africa.


THE FORGOTTEN PEOPLE: CARE FOR PEOPLE DYING OF AIDS IN SUB-
SAHARAN AFRICA

http://www.id21.org/zinter/id21zinter.exe?a=3&i=h5rh2g1&u=404336b3

What care do sufferers of AIDS receive in sub-Saharan Africa
(SSA)? If their lives cannot be saved, are their last days made
as comfortable as possible? As more funding is made available
for the care of terminally-ill AIDS patients, it is important to
look at the level of care currently available. King's College
London, together with the US Office of National AIDS Policy,
conducted a survey across 14 SSA countries to discover the end-
of-life care AIDS patients are currently receiving. As hospitals
cannot cope with the sheer numbers of patients, care must take
place in the community. Nevertheless, while home-based care
seems the only possible solution due to the scale of the epi-
demic, communities can be overwhelmed by the burden placed on
them.


AFRICA-WIDE ACTION TO IMPROVE ACCESS TO HIV/AIDS TREATMENT

Recognising the need for an Africa-wide movement, a Pan- African
Treatment Access Movement (PATAM) has been founded. Zackie Ach-
mat of the Treatment Action Campaign (TAC) of South Africa, and
Milly Katana, lobbying and advocacy officer of the Health Rights
Action Group in Uganda were among the founders. PATAM is a so-
cial movement comprised of individuals and organisations dedi-
cated to mobilising communities, political leaders and all sec-
tors of society to ensure access to anti-retroviral therapy, as
a fundamental part of comprehensive care for all people living
with HIV and AIDS in Africa. Since its inauguration on August
22, 2002, the movement has been growing. On March 4-6, PATAM
will be hosting its third regional conference on Access to
Treatment in Harare, Zimbabwe.

Further details:
http://www.equinetafrica.org/newsletter/index.php?id=1851


AIDS QUICK FIX WON'T SAVE AFRICA

http://www.scienceinafrica.co.za/2004/january/aids.htm

Short-term relief followed by long-term disaster is not sound
policy. Nonetheless, that could be a result of the Aids strategy
being contemplated by the World Health Organisation, which on
December 1 - World Aids Day - announced a plan to treat 3-
million people with HIV/Aids by 2005. The WHO is proposing that
billions of dollars be spent on increasing access to anti-
retroviral drugs. That is a noble intention. However, it may not
be the most cost-effective way to stem the tide of HIV/Aids: it
may even be counterproductive. Let's be clear. Reducing the cost
and increasing the supply of medicines to the poor is a good
thing. But on its own it is not enough. Nor should it be today's
priority. The roots of Africa's health care crisis run far
deeper and broader than a mere shortage of drugs.


--
The Southern Health & Ecology Institute
mailto:shae@worldonline.co.za