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[afro-nets] C-Channel - NEW e-newsletter from C -Change


  • From: "Leela McCullough" <leela@healthnet.org>
  • Date: Fri, 12 Sep 2008 16:32:50 -0400

Dear Colleagues,

This introduces the premier issue of C-Channel, the e-newsletter from the C-Change (Communication for Change) program, on research in communication for behavior and social change. Funded by USAID and led by AED, the purpose of C-Change is to improve the effectiveness and sustainability of communication for behavior change and social change as an integral part of development efforts.

Information is a powerful tool. C-Channel readers in low and middle income countries who face difficulty in searching for health information on the Internet will be able to access selected, current knowledge from peer-reviewed journal literature via C-Channel. We expect that C-Channel will raise awareness of new research findings; influence practice in program management and implementation, policy making, service delivery, and research; and support the education of health and development workers. Readers will be able to make informed decisions about their work based on recent, peer-reviewed research evidence.

Articles for the e-newsletter are selected for their emphasis on communication for behavior change and social change; they provide state-of-the-art, relevant, reliable information on a variety of content areas, including family planning, reproductive health, HIV and AIDS, malaria, and social and gender norms. Primary sources of information are peer-reviewed journals, some of which are Open Access journals. C-Channel makes available, free-of-charge to readers in the developing world, via email, the abstracts and latest articles from selected peer-reviewed journals. The free-of-charge feature is a hallmark of AED-SATELLIFE's information products based on long-standing agreements they have forged with many publishers. For readers in the developed world, the email includes the title with a short descriptive note and a link to the full article, freely available in Open Access, or downloadable upon payment of a fee to the journal.

To comply with our agreements with publishers, C-Change must confirm the country of each subscriber. Therefore, this first issue of C-Channel will not contain full articles. The link will access an abstract or summary only. It is expected that with the second issue, eligible subscribers will have access to the full articles.

To continue receiving subsequent monthly issues of C-Channel, you must SUBSCRIBE using our simple subscription system. To SUBSCRIBE, please click:
Developing World http://sympa.healthnet.org/wws/subscribe/c-channel-dw or
Industrialized World http://sympa.healthnet.org/wws/subscribe/c-channel-iw
If your colleagues or affiliated institutions have e-mail access and would like to receive C-Channel, please have them contact
mailto:c-channel@healthnet.org.

Your comments and suggestions are always welcome and can be sent to mailto:c-channel@healthnet.org.

Thank you,

The Knowledge Management Team at C-Change

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

HIV/AIDS
1. The Perpetration of Intimate Partner Violence, and the Practice of Transactional Sex among Men Who Have Multiple, Female Sexual Partners
2. Prevalence and Meanings of Exchange of Money or Gifts for Sex in Unmarried Adolescent Sexual Relationships in Sub-Saharan Africa
3. Behavioural Strategies to Reduce HIV Transmission: How to Make Them Work Better

FAMILY PLANNING/REPRODUCTIVE HEALTH
4. Influence of Social Connectedness, Communication and Monitoring on Adolescent Sexual Activity in Ghana
5. Couple Decision Making and Use of Cultural Scripts in Malawi

MALARIA
6. A Community-Based Health Education Programme for Bio-Environmental Control of Malaria through Folk Theatre (Kalajatha) in Rural India
7. Malaria in Rural Burkina Faso: Local Illness Concepts, Patterns of Traditional Treatment and Influence on Health-Seeking Behaviour

COMMUNICATION AND BEHAVIOR CHANGE
8. Evaluation of the Reach and Impact of the 100% Jeune Youth Social Marketing Program in Cameroon: Findings from Three Cross-Sectional Surveys
9. The Reach and Impact of Social Marketing and Reproductive Health Communication Campaigns in Zambia

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SUBSCRIPTION INFORMATION
To continue receiving subsequent monthly issues of C-Channel, you must subscribe.
Please click: Developing World http://sympa.healthnet.org/wws/subscribe/c-channel-dw or
Industrialized World http://sympa.healthnet.org/wws/subscribe/c-channel-iw

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HIV/AIDS

1. The Perpetration of Intimate Partner Violence, and the Practice of Transactional Sex among Men Who Have Multiple, Female Sexual Partners Authors: L Townsend, C Mathews, R Jewkes, M Chopra, L Johnston, H O?Bra Source: 4th Public Health Association of South Africa Conference 2008

This study compares the sexual behaviors of 420 Cape Town men, with multiple female partners and at least one partner under age 18. The details of intimate partner violence, condom use and transactional sex are explored in the context of casual and main female partners. Participants who were older than 34 years, as well as those who had used a condom at last sex, were significantly less likely to commit any form of intimate partner violence (IPV) against their main partners. Transactional sex was found to occur significantly more with casual partners than the with main partner. http://phasa2008.mrc.ac.za/abstract95.pdf

2. Prevalence and Meanings of Exchange of Money or Gifts for Sex in Unmarried Adolescent Sexual Relationships in Sub-Saharan Africa
Authors: AM Moore, AE Biddlecom, EM Zulu
Source: African Journal of Reproductive Health 2007, 11:3 pp.44-61

In a national survey conducted in 2004, adolescents ages 12-19, from Burkina
Faso, Ghana, Malawi, and Uganda were questioned on their sexual activity during the 12 months prior to the survey. Using this survey data, this study analyzes the characteristics associated with receiving money or gifts for sex and determined sex for money is a routine feature of dating rather than a coercive force. No association was made between the receiving of gifts or money and condom use.
http://www.ajol.info/viewarticle.php?jid=49&id=37332&layout=abstract

3. Behavioural Strategies to Reduce HIV Transmission: How to Make Them Work Better
Authors: Thomas J Coates PhD, Linda Richter PhD, Carlos Caceres MD
Source: The Lancet, Early Online Publication 2008 Aug 6

This paper identifies common factors found in successful prevention efforts. Using these common factors along with insights from research studies, key strategies to reduce HIV transmission are specified. Radical and sustained behavioral changes by individuals in sufficient numbers are needed and require a mix of communication channels with messages that motivate people to reduce risky behaviors. This includes using multilevel approaches (targeting couples, families, social networks, and communities); and employing many goals (increased condom use, reduction in number of partners, etc.) to reduce HIV transmission.
http://www.thelancet.com/journals/lancet/article/PIIS0140673608608867/abstract?isEOP=true


FAMILY PLANNING/REPRODUCTIVE HEALTH

4. Influence of Social Connectedness, Communication and Monitoring on Adolescent Sexual Activity in Ghana
Authors: A Kumi-Kyereme, K Awusabo-Asare, A Biddlecom, A Tanle
Source: African Journal of Reproductive Health 2007, 11:3 pp.133-147

This qualitative study explores the significant role that external relationships and communication play, in addition to that of the family, on the sexual activity of unmarried adolescents in Ghana. High levels of adult monitoring were observed, as was family connectedness, but in both cases this study found that communication about sex-related subject matter was lower with family than with non family members.
http://www.ajol.info/viewarticle.php?id=37337

5. Couple Decision Making and Use of Cultural Scripts in Malawi
Authors: Mbweza E, Norr KF, McElmurry B
Source: Journal Nursing Scholarship 2008, 40:1 pp.12-9

This study examines the decision making process of 60 Malawian husbands and wives on money, food, pregnancy, contraception use and sexual relations. A mix of final decision making was found in most couples. Gender-based cultural scripts were used to justify husband-dominated or wife-dominated decision making. Non-gender-based cultural scripts justified shared decision making processes. According to this study, culturally tailored reproductive health interventions for couples can be designed using identified non-gender-based cultural scripts.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18302586?ordinalpos=19&itool=EntrezSystem2.PEntrez.Pubmed.Pubmed_ResultsPanel.Pubmed_RVDocSum


MALARIA

6. A Community-Based Health Education Programme for Bio-Environmental
Control of Malaria through Folk Theatre (Kalajatha) in Rural India
Authors: Susanta K Ghosh, Rajan R Patil, Satyanarayan Tiwari and Aditya P Dash
Source: Malaria Journal 2006, 5:123

Kalajatha, a traditional art form of folk theater in India, was used to showcase malaria control and prevention. In December 2001, the showcase visited two villages and spent two hours in each village. This study, involving the primary health care system, the local community and various potential partners, assessed the effects of the use of Kalajatha on malaria health education. Kalajatha was found to increase knowledge and change attitudes about malaria significantly. More specifically, the attendees were able to understand that clean water contained malaria carrying mosquito larvae, as the main intervention of malaria control in that area at the time were fish that ate mosquito larvae.
http://www.malariajournal.com/content/5/1/123/abstract

7. Malaria in Rural Burkina Faso: Local Illness Concepts, Patterns of Traditional Treatment and Influence on Health-Seeking Behaviour
Authors: Claudia Beiersmann, Aboubakary Sanou, Evelyn Wladarsch, Manuela De Allegri, Bocar Kouyaté and Olaf Müller
Source: Malaria Journal 2007, 6:106

This study explores how a rural community in Burkina Faso conceptualizes malaria. Uncomplicated malaria, respiratory distress syndrome, cerebral malaria, and severe anemia were the four main local illness concepts identified. These concepts are analyzed to determine how they may affect the community?s treatment and provider choices. Modern health facilities were found to be preferable when treating anemia, whereas respiratory distress syndrome and cerebral malaria were preferably treated by traditional healers.
http://www.malariajournal.com/content/6/1/106/abstract


COMMUNICATION AND BEHAVIOR CHANGE

8. Evaluation of the Reach and Impact of the 100% Jeune Youth Social Marketing Program in Cameroon: Findings from Three Cross-Sectional Surveys
Authors: Andrea Plautz and Dominique Meekers
Source: Reproductive Health 2007; 4:1

The 100% Jeune youth social marketing program targets 15 to 24-year-olds living in the two largest cities in Cameroon, using a combination of mass media and interpersonal communication strategies to motivate youth to consistently use condoms or abstain from sex. Based on trends in reproductive health behavior, assessed from the data of the Cameroon Adolescent Reproductive Health Survey, this study evaluates how the variety of communication methods used by 100% Jeune, affects reproductive health outcomes among unmarried youth. Findings show the program helped increase condom use with regular partners and significantly more with casual partners, but did not have a significant effect on abstinence.
http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1810514&rendertype=abstract

9. The Reach and Impact of Social Marketing and Reproductive Health Communication Campaigns in Zambia
Authors: Ronan Van Rossem and Dominique Meekers
Source: BioMed Central Public Health 2007, 7:352

In this study, Zambia's social marketing and health communication programs were assessed to determine their efficacy and impact on condom use. This study compares the influence of TV and radio programs about family planning and HIV/AIDS on men and women and gives suggestions for future social marketing plans. Findings show exposure among women to either of these type of TV or radio programs had a small but significant effect on condom use, especially among Protestant, younger women. Similar results were found in men, who were exposed to either of these types of TV or radio programs, with more of an increased use overall.
http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2458/7/352/abstract

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C-Change, managed by AED, is USAID's flagship program to improve the effectiveness and sustainability of communication programs for behavior and social change in low and middle income countries. To contact us, please send an email to mailto:c-channel@healthnet.org
Additional information about the project is available at the website
www.c-changeprogram.org

--
Leela McCullough, Ed.D.
Director of Information Services

AED-SATELLIFE Center for Health Information and Technology
30 California Street, Watertown, MA 02472, USA
Tel: +617-926-9400 Fax: +617-926-1212
Email: lmccullough@aed.org
Web: http://www.healthnet.org